WindsorSuburb Profile

Windsor

The suburb is dominated by Hamilton Hill, from which residents enjoy spectacular views of the river and the city. Views also extend to Mount Coot-tha to the west and Moreton Bay to the east. Whilst Hamilton features many of Brisbane’s grandest old homes, including the iconic Toorak House at the crest of Hamilton Hill, the suburb still features great diversity in both the housing and the residents which call the area home.

Snapshot of Windsor

Windsor, an inner suburb of Brisbane, is 5km north-east of the city centre. The Windsor area was at first locally governed by the Ithaca divisional board (1880) which was responsible for an area extending westwards from the Sandgate Road (Nundah) to the foothills of the D’Aguilar Range (The Gap, Toowong). In 1887 the Windsor district was severed from Ithaca, becoming Windsor Shire, probably named after Windsor Castle in the golden jubilee year of Queen Victoria’s reign. The Shire, comprising 10.5 sq km, was bounded generally by Enoggera Road, Enoggera/Breakfast Creek, Sandgate Road, Bonney Road and its prolongation back to Kedron Brook. The Shire contained Albion (part), Eagle Junction (part), Wooloowin, Kalinga, Kedron High School’s site, Lutwyche, Grange, Alderley (part), Newmarket, Wilston and Windsor.

Windsor has parklands on its southern border next to Enoggera Creek, and its more central heritage-listed Memorial Park (1925) with a war memorial. The growth of population required a service reservoir in 1930 at Eildon Hill, around which a third larger reserve was laid out. Eildon Hill gives views over Brisbane, as far as the Glass House Mountains and Victoria Point on a clear day. It was the site of one of the early genteel estates where George Wight built Eildon House in 1863.

Eildon Hill and other elevated positions have several heritage-listed houses. Boothville (1887), 43 Seventh Avenue, is a two-storey building erected for a prosperous bank manager and has retained much of its original cartilage. Kirkston (1889) at 23 Rupert Street and Oakwal (1864) at 50 Bush Street also have hilly positions. Local bricks went into many of the houses, and there is a pair of brick-makers’ cottages at 25-27 Bess Street.

Subscribe to Beth’s newsletter to receive her latest listings and off-market listings before anyone else!